GRI Reporting 2025 — Future of Reporting: Deeper Integration, Greater Scrutiny

The GRI global organization is looking ahead to the sustainability and reporting trends in 2025, GRI’s Reporting 2025 project aims to facilitate the discussion around the future of reporting. These papers examine the key decisions businesses will focus on in the next decade in order to transition to a sustainable economy, and how disclosure and reporting should be shaped to support decision makers in this process.

The insights presented in this Second Analysis Paper Sustainability and Reporting Trends in 2025, launched in October 2015, provide the main conclusions of the Sustainability and Reporting 2025 project. They result from the analysis of 22 interviews conducted as part of the project, as well as other sources.
Download the Second Analysis Paper 

 

 

 

 In May 2015 GRI published the First Analysis Paper, which provided the first set of preliminary conclusions of the Sustainability and Reporting 2025 project. They resulted from the analysis of the first nine interviews conducted as part of the project, as well as other sources.

Download the First Analysis Paper

 

1 thought on “GRI Reporting 2025 — Future of Reporting: Deeper Integration, Greater Scrutiny

  1. I find the methodological drive toward consensus in the second report, the trends considered and the associated views not particularly surprising. That generates concern. Predicting future scenarios accurately is very challenging.
    I found myself thinking what this approach would have generated if it were applied in the late 1990s when GRI was first introduced. I doubt that the impact of climate change or the diversity of screening and treatments by various groups, ratings agencies and institutional investors would have been foreseen.
    Rather than considering the most likely outcome, it might be more insightful to think about a wider range of possible futures for reporting, and for each of them develop a detailed scenario. The aim would be to stimulate thinking about how reporting should be structured so it could be developed more robustly and be applicable for any of the likely contingencies. A good example of this is the Shell Scenario Scramble versus Blueprint.

    I am sure that the reporting profession will change more in the next decade than in the previous two and that data technology will have a significant impact as envisioned in the paper. As seen elsewhere, new skills and disciplines will emerge leveraging data technology in the form of ‘knowledge engineering’. Perhaps we should consider future reporting as the means by which these new professionals will apply this knowledge.

    The results will most probably be very different to what we envision today.

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