Why the Olive Tree and Sustainability?

by Ken Cynar — Editor, G&A Institute’s “Accountability Central” and “Sustainability HQ” web platforms and the weekly Sustainability Highlights newsletter

As a viewer of our public information-sharing websites and our weekly Sustainability Highlights newsletter you may have noticed that we frequently use the picture of an aged olive tree to illustrate certain stories about sustainability. What is the connection? And why this olive tree?

The tree is a powerful symbol. The olive tree grows naturally throughout the Mediterranean region and also in Asia and Africa, but has been cultivated in other parts of the world. Thousands of acres can be seen throughout Italy and Spain, the Middle East and parts of North Africa.

The tree grows slowly and steadily in marginal climate and soil conditions utilizing just the water it needs without sapping all the minerals from the soil. ”Olive trees show a marked preference for calcareous soils, flourishing best on limestone slopes and crags, and coastal climate conditions. They grow in any light soil, even on clay if well drained, but in rich soils, they are predisposed to disease and produce poorer oil than in poorer soil.”

Their existence is mentioned in both the Old and New testaments of the Bible, as well as in Greek and Roman literature. The trees are noted for their longevity with frequent examples dating back from 1,000 to almost 2,000 years. It is these qualities that make them an excellent illustration for today’s focus on societal sustainability.

Why this particular olive tree? This tree is situated in the Valley of the Temples in Agrigento, Sicily, just about two hundred meters from the Temple of Hercules, the oldest temple on the site. Here stood the city of Akragas, one of the most important Greek colonies in Sicily, founded around 582 BC by settlers from nearby Gela and from Rhodes.

 

Olive trees dot the old city with this particular one purported to be nearly 2,000 years old. Very few things on earth can boast of being that old, weathering climate changes, wars, famine, plague, etc. I took this picture because of its location and stately appearance and the guide’s assurance of the aged tree. We all know guides do not lie, right?

So here we have it. The olive tree is known for its toughness, measured growth, economy of scale and longevity, even facing myriad natural and man-made challenges.

Aren’t these the qualities of a sustainable company?

And here (photo) is this particular tree. Occupying a site that goes back to a city founded 2,500 years ago. Its roots are deep into the history of civilization, the time of the Romans and the Greeks. In fact, historians have verified that this site has been occupied by human civilization for more than 7,000 years and even then olive trees grew in this Valley.

This illustration was not selected by chance, but with deep respect and a measured recognition of its history and stature and powerful symbolism of the ancient olive tree in the 21st Century society.

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Ken Cynar is Editor-in-Chief of Governance & Accountability Institute, and manages its public-sharing web sites, Accountability Central and SustainabilityHQ. He is editor of the firm’s weekly newsletter – Sustainability Highlights – reaching almost 15,000 professionals interested in sustainability topics and issues.

The quote is from Israel, posted by Alexandra Ben-Abba, from Outer Seed Shadow.

State of Corporate Sustainability, GreenBiz Releases Latest Update — Top Lines: (1) We are making progress and (2) There are still challenges

by Hank Boerner –  Chair and Chief Strategist – G&A Institute

It’s now three-quarters of the way through the year 2018 – what is the state of the Sustainability Profession?  John Davies, writing in GreenBiz (he’s VP & Senior Analyst), shares some interesting highlights gained through the firm’s recent report with us this week.

Among the major themes:  (1) Companies large and small see advances – progress – more companies are communicating what they are doing.  (2) Serious concerns, challenges, barriers are still ahead (look at what is happening to the US SEC and the dismissal of sound science by policymakers).

The Greenbiz report on the state of the profession is always eagerly awaited (every-other-year) and the latest (the 2018 report) is available for you (the link is in the Top Story).

GreenBiz presented results of its research on such items as gender pay equity trends; the embedding of the sustainability role(s) throughout the organization; more professionals coming in to the firm from outside vs. being promoted from within; and, the corporate sustainability programs becoming more sustainable.

There is also an interesting collection of news items we’ve selected for you that describes the range of activities within industries as companies of all sizes as the “corporate sustainability wave” gains momentum.  It’s below the Top Story for you.

This Week’s Top Story

The State of the Sustainability Profession, 2018
(Tuesday – September 25, 2018) Source: GreenBiz – That’s a significant change from 2011, when the Governance & Accountability Institute found just under 20 percent of S&P 500 companies were publishing such reports.

And we call your attention to:
Sustainable Brands Delivers Insight on How to Build Better Sustainability Metrics
(Friday – September 28, 2018) Source: Sustainable Brands – Sustainable Brands® reveals program, networking and activity highlights for its upcoming conference: New Metrics 2018. Nearly 400 business executives will convene October 29-31 at the Loews…