A Fascinating Look Into the 21st Century – The Forbes Interview With Hank Boerner by Chris Skroupa

Of interest, The Forbes interview by Chris Skroupa of G&A Institute chair and chief strategist, Hank Boerner.  As we move deeper into the 21st Century, what are some of the ingredients for business success?  To a significant degree, these will include the important foundations put in place in the 19th and 20th Century.  As we innovate, we also build on the previous decades’ innovations, Boerner suggests.  And while it is difficult, of course, to predict the future, we can look at what worked in terms of breakthrough thinking and tinkerers’ insights (such as John Rockefeller, Thomas Edison, Henry Ford, Steve Jobs, all the way back to the 18th Century breakthrough by James Watt and the steam engine) that led the way for industrialization and continue to point the way in the 21st Century to future innovations and breakthrough thinking (like that of Elon Musk).This is a fascinating conversation that we think you will enjoy reading.  It’s a good companion piece to the insights offered by Sustainable Brands’ Dimitar Vhalov.

And do tune in to the Skytop Strategies and G&A Institute conference on the 21st Century company coming in June at Baruch College/CUNY in New York City – click here for more information.

The 21st-Century Company: Is It Different From Companies Of Yesteryear?
(Tuesday – April 22, 2016)
Source: Forbes – Christopher P. Skroupa: Here we are in the middle of the second decade of the 21st Century. What is different for “21st Century companies” from those of the previous century? Hank Boerner: In general, there is a fascination with the concepts of centuries and decades. Kids growing up in the 1960s were different from those of the 70s and so on. Decades as we recall them may be somewhat similar, but there are very dramatic differences between centuries in business, politics, culture, economics, and other human endeavors…

“Purpose” – It is Central to Business Success Says a Sustainable Brands Thinker As He Explores the Sustainability/CR Intersection

What may sound at first glance to be “touchy-feely” management advice turns out to be solid guidance to corporate executives and managers strategizing about “bullet-proofing” their companies and brands for the immediate and the long-term.  Dimitar Vhalov, the Director of Content for Sustainable Brands, explains in our Top Story the importance of “purpose” for companies as the enterprise is made more resilient and focused as part of “future-proofing,” especially for brand marketers.

There are seven trends to watch in 2016 at the “intersection” of sustainability and purpose, he explains.  These include “next level leadership frameworks” to provide an integrated, interdisciplinary innovation mindset that will help executives put systems-driven processes in place to set the right goals and take concrete actions to achieve the goals.  These include “Evonomics” and “The Embedding Project” and “Vaultus.”  Are these new to you?  Read more in the story link below to learn what they mean – and the importance of “purpose” in the context of sustainability and corporate responsibility.

And do look into the fantastic conference presented every year by the Sustainable Brands organization (this year in June in San Diego) -– click here for more information.

7 Trends at the Intersection of Sustainability and Purpose to Watch This Year
(Tuesday – April 19, 2016)
Source: Sustainable Brands - There is widespread consensus in the global Sustainable Brands community that purpose is trending in the business world, especially among brands that are looking beyond the next quarter and trying to figure out how to thrive in…

FLASH REPORT: G&A Institute and Bloomberg LP Partnered to Examine Bloomberg ESG Disclosure Scores For S&P 500 Companies Reporting VS Not Reporting on Sustainability

- Results Show Companies Not Publishing Sustainability Reports Are Disadvantaged by Lower Average Bloomberg ESG Disclosure Scores 

New York, New York — April 26, 2016 — Continuing the in-depth analysis of S&P 500 (r) companies’ sustainability reporting activities, Governance & Accountability Institute teamed with Bloomberg LP to analyze the data, scores and perceptions presented to investment professionals using the Bloomberg Professional information platform which features ESG data and assigns disclosure scores for public companies.

The average ESG Disclosure Score assigned by Bloomberg LP reflects the disclosure activities of companies related to their” E” (environmental), “S” (social/societal) and “G” (corporate governance) strategies, performance and related activities.  

G&A Institute’s EVP Louis Coppola noted: “The difference in average disclosure scores are greatest in ‘E’ and ‘S’ data in particular. The ‘G’ scores are higher in general and less of a difference due to the level of governance disclosure mandated in the United States of America and the general agreement on G’s materiality. In contrast, there are only a few mandated disclosures in the E & S areas, with less decision-useful data being available, and more varied issues and opinions on the subject of materiality.”

The overall results of the joint analysis show that companies that publish sustainability reports are scoring higher on the Bloomberg ESG Disclosure scores than companies that do not report:

  • Bloomberg ‘E’ Disclosure Score
    The average Bloomberg ‘E’ Disclosure score of S&P 500 non-reporters is 5, while reporters enjoy an average of 23, a 360% higher average ‘E’ score for reporters.
  • Bloomberg ‘S’ Disclosure Score
    The average Bloomberg ‘S’ Disclosure score of S&P 500 non-reporters is 15, while reporters enjoy an average of 30, a 100% higher average ‘S’ score for reporters.
  • Bloomberg ‘G’ Disclosure Score
    The average Bloomberg ‘G’ Disclosure score of S&P 500 non-reporters is 52, while reporters have slightly higher average of 58, a 12% higher average score ‘G’ for reporters.  


About Bloomberg ESG Disclosure Scores 

Hideki Suzuki, Senior Corporate Governance Data Analyst at Bloomberg, explained: “The Bloomberg ESG disclosure score is purely a gauge on transparency – assessing how much ESG quantitative and policy-related data a company is disclosing, regardless of improvement or deterioration on the metrics over time. Scores are low for disclosure without quantum. This explains low scores among reporters. For example, we see lengthy sustainability reports with charts and graphs but contain no numerical data.”

He continued: “ESG investment space continues to evolve. We are moving beyond disclosure. Bloomberg provides performance assessment tools based on quant data provided by companies (http://www.bloomberg.com/professional/equities/). For that to be meaningful and actionable by investors, we need quality data from companies that is aligned with company fiscal year-end and scope of disclosure covering what is covered in their financial statement disclosure.”

About Bloomberg LP 
Bloomberg LP is a global business and financial information and news leader with more than 325,000 global subscribers to its Bloomberg Professional Service, a data, analytics and information-delivery service. Bloomberg ESG products enable investors across a range of asset classes to understand the risks and opportunities associated with potential investments or counterparties as the market continues to embrace ESG.

The Importance to Sustainability to Bloomberg LP 
In the company’s Impact Report Update 2015, Bloomberg LP Chairman Michael Bloomberg noted:

“In recent years, we have taken a number of steps to enhance the data on sustainability that our products provide. We’ve added ESG data to the Bloomberg Terminal, purchased Bloomberg New Energy Finance, and helped to advance the emerging Green Bond Market. But our products can only be as good as the information they channel. And for the most part, the sustainability information that is disclosed by corporations today is not useful for investors or other decision-makers.”

Michael Bloomberg became chair of the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB) in 2014, and last year agreed to chair the new Task For on Climate-Related Financial Disclosures, announced at the United National Climate Conference in Paris, France.

Background for Editors 
The Flash Report – March 15, 2016 from G&A Institute: In the fifth annual monitoring and analysis of S&P 500 Index® company reporting just completed by the Governance & Accountability Institute research team, the findings are that eighty one percent (81%) of the companies included in this important investment benchmark published a sustainability or corporate responsibility report in 2015.

The S&P Index is one of the most widely-followed barometers of the U.S. economy, and conditions for large-cap public companies in the capital markets.

To put this in context, G&A in tracking prior year(s) reporting found that:

  • in 2011, just under 20% of S&P 500 companies had reported;
  • in 2012, 53% (for the first time a majority) of S&P 500 companies were reporting;
  • by 2013, 72% were reporting — that is 7-out-of-10 of all companies in the popular benchmark;
  • in 2014, 75% of the S&P 500 were publishing reports.

As we entered year 2016, just 19% of the S&P 500 were not publishing sustainability reports. The practice of reporting by the 500 companies is now holding steady with minor increases year-after-year. The chart below represents the trends of S&P 500 sustainability reporting over the last five years:


Governance & Accountability Institute’s GRI Data Partner Report Analyst Research Team of talented interns contributed significantly to this research and we recognize them here:

  • Julia Casciotti
  • Alexander Cohen
  • Kristina Jette Mullen
  • Ashley Thomsen
  • Alvis Yuen

For more information on our GRI Data Partner Report Analyst Research Interns, please visit http://www.ga-institute.com/the-honor-roll.html

ABOUT GOVERNANCE & ACCOUNTABILITY INSTITUTE, INC.
Founded in 2006, G&A Institute is a sustainability consulting firm headquartered in New York City, advising corporations in executing winning strategies that maximize return on investment at every step of their sustainability journey. The G&A team helps corporate and investment community clients recognize, understand and address sustainability issues to address stakeholder and shareholder concerns. G&A Institute is the exclusive Data Partner for the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) in the USA, UK and Ireland. A G&A team of six or more perform this pro bono work on behalf of GRI. Over the past 5 years, G&A has analyzed more than 5,000 sustainability reports in this role and databased more than 100 important data points for each of the five thousand reports.

G&A’s sustainability-focused services and resources include: counseling & strategies for the corporate sustainability journey; sustainability reporting assistance; thorough materiality assessments; stakeholder engagement; benchmarking; enhancing investor relations; sustainability communications; manager coaching, team building & training; advice on third party awards, recognitions and index inclusions; issues monitoring & customized research.

*S&P 500® 
According to S&P Dow Jones Indices / McGraw Hill Financial: “The S&P 500® is widely regarded as the best single gauge of large cap U.S. equities. There is over US$7 trillion benchmarked to the index, with index assets comprising approximately US$ 1.9 trillion of this total. The index includes 500 leading companies and captures approximately 80% coverage of available market capitalization.” The S&P 500 is a trademarked® property of S&P Dow Jones Indices, McGraw Hill Financial.

FAST APPROACHING: The Deadline For Registering for the Corporate Social Responsibility Certificate Program at Rutgers Institute for Ethical Leadership

CSR CERTIFICATE PROGRAM – FACULTY / COURSE UPDATE
REGISTER FOR THE 2-DAY COURSE HERE

The first sessions of the new Corporate Social Responsibility Certificate program is just a week away — there are a few remaining days for registration. The two-day program begins on Wednesday, April 27 and continues on Thursday, April 28 at Rutgers Business School in Newark, New Jersey.

JOIN YOUR CSR PROFESSIONAL COLLEAGUES ON APRIL 27-28, 2016

  • Representatives from organizations such as Johnson & Johnson and the United Way of St. Louis.
  • Participants traveling from multiple states including MD, MO, NC, NJ, NY and VA.
  • Network, learn and earn your certificate from an accomplished group of real world experts in the field of CSR & Sustainability.

DAY 1 
Topics to be presented on Day One by experienced CSR, Ethics and Philanthropy professionals include:

  • Overview of CSR (Speaker: Ellen Lambert, PSEG)
  • CSR & Ethics (Speaker: James Abruzzo, Rutgers Institute for Ethical Leadership)
  • CSR — Ethics, Business & Society (Speaker: Kevin Lyons, Rutgers Business School)
  • Global Risks & CSR Dinner (Speaker: Tim McClimon, – American Express)


Ellen-Lambert-217pxPRESENTER SPOTLIGHT
ELLEN LAMBERT
Topic: CSR Overview

Addressing: What does CSR look like across companies including employee engagement, marketing and culture; what are the trends on the local, national and international basis?

The veteran CSR professional will present a broad look at corporate citizenship including fundamentals, a discussion of how different corporations create the scope and navigate their citizenship, culture and employee involvement. This will include an analysis of a number of different industries and corporate social responsibility models.

DAY 2
The program continues on Day Two (April 28) with sessions on:

  • CSR & Implications for the Non-profit Sector (Speaker: Peter Hansen, NJPAC)
  • Materiality & the Case for Sustainability (Speakers: Louis Coppola, G&A Institute and Peter Roselle, Morgan Stanley)
  • CSR and Return on Investment (ROI) (Speakers: Eric Fernald, MSCI)

Peter-Hansen-217pxPRESENTER SPOTLIGHT
PETER HANSEN
Topic: CSR and Implications for the Nonprofit Sector – utilizing case studies of corporate foundations that have aligned products, services and social investments

Addressing: This session will explore how the development and adoption of CSR platforms by public and privately-held corporations have accelerated.

There is a considerable impact — both positive and negative — on nonprofits when corporations align their strategic philanthropy with their business goals. This session will briefly examine three CSR programs and the positive and negative impact of each on nonprofit organizations. A critical outcome of this presentation is to help participants understand the strategic philanthropic priorities of select corporate sectors.

To learn more about the CSR Certificate program, call 973.353.1134, email leadership@business.rutgers.edu, or visit http://www.business.rutgers.edu/iel/csr.

<< CLICK HERE TO REGISTER ONLINE NOW >>
Note: 10% discount applied for 2+ registrants from the same organization

 

ABOUT GOVERNANCE & ACCOUNTABILITY INSTITUTE

G&Alogo_open_140pxlGovernance & Accountability Institute is a sustainability consulting firm headquartered in New York City, assisting corporations in executing winning strategies that maximize return on investment at every step of their sustainability journey. The G&A team helps corporate and investment community clients recognize, understand and address sustainability issues to address stakeholder and shareholder concerns. G&A Institute is the exclusive Data Partner for the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) in the USA, UK and Ireland. A G&A team of six or more perform this pro bono work on behalf of GRI. In 2015, they analyzed more than 1,200 sustainability reports in this role and databased more than 100 important data points related to each report.

G&A’s sustainability-focused services and resources include: counseling & strategies for the corporate sustainability journey; sustainability reporting assistance; thorough materiality assessments; stakeholder engagement; benchmarking; enhancing investor relations; sustainability communications; manager coaching, team building and training; issues monitoring & customized research; advice on third party awards and recognitions. Visit G&A at www.ga-institute.com

ABOUT THE INSTITUTE FOR ETHICAL LEADERSHIP

rutgers_bschool-logox200pxThe Institute for Ethical Leadership at Rutgers Business School works with business and government, nonprofit and philanthropic organizations, and within Rutgers University to provide leaders and future leaders with the education, training and critical-thinking tools needed to become more effective leaders and managers and make ethical decisions for real-world challenges. For more information, visit www.business.rutgers.edu/iel.

Sounds Like a Good Sustainability Strategy in the C-Suite / Board Room — But What About On the Ground in Locations Thousands of Miles Away?

Many businesses over the past three decades have reshaped themselves, becoming “multi-national enterprises” (MNEs in NGO-speak), thanks in great measure to the advances in information and other technologies, where everywhere is a keyboard click away for communication, and to the end of the Cold War in 1989-1990.  Corporate organizations have also become “flatter,” with power and influence dispersed (more) to the far reaches of the operations or supply chain footprint.

Since 1970 and the first Earth Day, corporate leaders have addressed environmental issues with innovative ideas and solutions, making many parts of this planet a very cleaner place to live, work and play.  But what do these changes, some very dramatic, mean when ideas and innovations created at the top of the organization have to be applied at the very bottom by local managers and employees?

What sounds good at “the top” (strategy and course of action) may or may not work on the ground for the organization  at locations thousands of miles away.  Folks in charge there may not get the word, have little real power to implement, or may be working under conditions that are not conducive to implementing the strategy.  This applies to the continuing embrace of corporate sustainability by MNE’s or all shapes and sizes, in all industries and sectors and geographies.  The author of our Top Story this week explores some of those issues for us.

Richard Brubaker is Founder & Managing Director, Collective Responsibility, a Shanghai-based organization set up to aid in the development and execution of projects in Asia that focuses on solving environmental, economic and social challenges in the region.  He shares some lessons learned in his commentary.

As the C-suite of the MNE in the developed country creates appropriate strategies and focuses on “big picture” issues (think, what do we do about our carbon footprint in the post-Paris public policy environment), the people on the ground half-a-world away may be struggling with very different issues. (We recall the old saying, “when you are up to your butt in alligators it is hard to remember the mission is to drain the swamp.”)

The locals may be using a different language; dealing with different concerns; seeing the C-suite / HQs mission as being misaligned with the local mission; where KPIs may not apply….and more.  The commentary is timely, and coming from an experienced Asian hand, as we celebrate Earth Day #46 on 22 April, marking a time when corporate executives and boards may be looking into :”what can we do locally” in the operations to make an impact as global populations focus on environmental issues.  Including at the very local level!

The first Earth Day (April 22, 1970 – almost a half-century ago) is considered by many to be the spark that helped to create the modern-day environmental movement.  There’s more about the history in the Earth Day.org files:http://www.earthday.org/about/the-history-of-earth-day/

“Why don’t they care?” Why top-down sustainability strategies are often doomed to fail
(Wednesday – April 13, 2016)
Source: Eco-Business - Effective sustainability strategies must speak the language of local employees and other stakeholders, writes Collective Responsibility managing director Richard Brubaker…

Rutgers / G&A CSR Certificate Update: Eric Fernald of MSCI, and Peter Roselle of Morgan Stanley

What is the ROI on Sustainability Led by Eric Fernald of MSCI, and Peter Roselle From Morgan Stanley Joins Louis Coppola as Co-Presenter for The Interactive Materiality Workshop

 

IMPORTANT NOTE:Registration Deadline Approaching for CSR Certificate Program at The Rutgers University Institute for Ethical Leadership – Click Here to Register for the 2-day Course

On April 27th and 28th, an outstanding faculty will present at the new two-day CSR Certificate Program at the Rutgers University Business School’s Ethical Leadership Institute in downtown Newark, New Jersey.

Registrants for the 2-day session will learn about the meaning of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and the series of important actions that need to be implemented to design a concise CSR strategy at their organizations. Participants will gain valuable insights and “shared wisdom” regarding best practices and current trends that will be shared by the outstanding faculty assembled for the two-day certificate course.

COURSE FACULTY INCLUDES

Eric Fernald is an Executive Director and Leader of ESG Research, Corporate Communications and Engagement Program at MSCI. Eric is also the ESG research lead for MSCI’s standard ESG indexes, and is a board member of the ESG Ratings Review Committee, which approves all major changes to MSCI ESG product offerings for investors.

Eric will be leading a course focused on Return on Investment of ESG and Sustainability from the investors’ point of view.

Eric has been involved in ESG (environmental, social, governance) research and product development since 1995, serving as KLD Research & Analytics director of research (2002-2009); KLD was acquired by MSCI in 2009. Eric is a well-known and influential voice in ESG and sustainability investing. MSCI is a US-based independent provider of research-driven insights and tools for institutional investors, with deep expertise in the areas of risk and performance measurement. MSCI is perhaps best known as a provider of equity indexes, including the MSCI World and MSCI EAFE Indexes.

Peter Roselle, CPM, CFP, is a Financial Advisor at Morgan Stanley. Peter has been a Certified Financial Planner since 1989. He holds an MBA from Seton Hall University. His work at Morgan Stanley involves helping executives and business owners with retirement and estate planning strategies and optimizing investment portfolios through sustainable investing principles.

Peter serves as vice chair of the Sustainable Investing Committee of the New York Society of Securities Analysts (NYSSA), the largest chapter of the Certified Financial Analysts Institute. Peter helps to plan and manage events for financial analysts and asset managers to learn more about the importance of CSR and corporate ESG performance as a factor in investment analysis and decision-making. Morgan Stanley is an American multinational financial services corporation headquartered in New York City.
JOIN YOUR CSR PROFESSIONAL COLLEAGUES ON APRIL 27-28, 2016
CSR professionals are invited to join their colleagues from organizations such as Johnson & Johnson and United Way of St. Louis to network, learn, and earn their certificate from an accomplished group of real world experts in the field of CSR & Sustainability.  Click here to register for the 2-day course.

To learn more about the CSR Certificate program, call 973.353.1134, email leadership@business.rutgers.edu, or visit http://www.business.rutgers.edu/iel/csr.

ABOUT GOVERNANCE & ACCOUNTABILITY INSTITUTE

Governance & Accountability Institute is a sustainability consulting firm headquartered in New York City, assisting corporations in executing winning strategies that maximize return on investment at every step of their sustainability journey. The G&A team helps corporate and investment community clients recognize, understand and address sustainability issues to address stakeholder and shareholder concerns. G&A Institute is the exclusive Data Partner for the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) in the USA, UK and Ireland. A G&A team of six or more perform this pro bono work on behalf of GRI. In 2015, they analyzed more than 1,200 sustainability reports in this role and databased more than 100 important data points related to each report.

G&A’s sustainability-focused services and resources include: counseling & strategies for the corporate sustainability journey; sustainability reporting assistance; thorough materiality assessments; stakeholder engagement; benchmarking; enhancing investor relations; sustainability communications; manager coaching, team building and training; issues monitoring & customized research; advice on third party awards and recognitions. Visit G&A at www.ga-institute.com

ABOUT THE INSTITUTE FOR ETHICAL LEADERSHIP
The Institute for Ethical Leadership at Rutgers Business School works with business and government, nonprofit and philanthropic organizations, and within Rutgers University to provide leaders and future leaders with the education, training and critical-thinking tools needed to become more effective leaders and managers and make ethical decisions for real-world challenges. For more information, visit www.business.rutgers.edu/iel.

Memo to the Corporate Board: Heads Up, It’s About Sustainability for the Long-Term

The boards of directors of publicly-traded companies have considerable influence over the many duties and responsibilities for the corporation to attend to.  Among them is oversight of risk (the two halves of risk: risk or threat and opportunity inherent therein).   We put effective risk management as one of the over-arching elements of corporate sustainability and responsibility.  What better way to address risk management duties at board level than to focus on the company’s ESG strategies?

Writing in Forbes, Dr. Bob Eccles (Harvard University, SASB, and Arabesque Partners) focuses our attention on corporate boards and what they are doing – and not doing – to address ESG strategies, initiatives, achievements – as part of their risk management duties as fiduciaries.

“Material ESG sustainability issues are increasingly being factored into corporate and investment decisions at the highest level,” Dr. Eccles observes.  “It is resulting in genuine sustainable strategies, instead of mere programs that are viewed as side shows to the company’s business.”

And so, Bob Eccles says, the strategies executed at scale by [some] of the world’s largest companies and investors will also contribute to planetary benefits. (See the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for examples of how this is working in the business community. Sign up for The Global Sourcing Council’s 17 Weeks / 17 SDGs for weekly insight.)   While this is good and welcome news, the world’s largest companies and investors – who control vast amounts of capital – are really not yet showing enough leadership in sustainability, says Dr. Eccles.

The key is for the board room to ensure that the corporation adopts a long-term focus – as forcefully advocated now to investors and corporate leaders by Larry Fink, the CEO of the world’s largest asset manager, Blackrock.  The Board should adopt rigorous analysis to identify the limited number of ESG issues that really are material to the company. And then act on them. And oversee the sustainability strategies being implemented at all levels, not just in some minor “set aside” sustainability function as described by Bob Eccles.

Read his fascinating – and challenging – commentary in the story below. Keep in mind that Professor Eccles is the leading voice at the Harvard Business School, and in both investor and corporate communities, for corporate sustainability.

Why It’s Time For Boards To Take A Stand On Sustainability
(Wednesday – March 30, 2016)
Source: Forbes - What is the biggest barrier to sustainable development? There are many, but I’d like to flag one that I think hasn’t received enough attention so far: boards of directors of companies and asset managers. Too many are only focused…

Rutgers / G&A CSR Certificate Update: Effective Supply Chain Management – What CSR Professionals Need To Know

Effective CSR & the Supply Chain Management Relationship — What CSR Professionals Need to Know About Procurement & The Importance of Supply Chain Environmental Archeology

For corporate responsibility and sustainability professionals, there is an important area that needs to be in focus — a critical area that presents challenges, risks and myriad opportunities: the global supply chain. Enterprises of all sizes, and in all industries and sectors, are (or are not!) making a difference in society, creating competitive advantages, and mitigating risks as represented by responsible supply chain and procurement practices.

The supply chain management and global procurement strategies and practices are being established at the highest levels of the corporate enterprise, and it is important that sustainability and responsibility professionals be aware of, and involved in both strategy-setting and effective implementation.

Rutgers University Business School’s Institute for Ethical Leadership and Governance & Accountability Institute have partnered to offer a Corporate Social Responsibility Certificate Program, with the sessions to be held in Newark, NJ on April 27th and 28th (at the city center business school facility).

One of the key topic areas in focus for participants is the focus on supply chain management. The sessions will be led by Dr. Kevin Lyons, associate professor at Rutgers Business School, Supply Chain Management Department, and will focus on these critical topics for corporate managers:

  • Focusing on four main supply chain and sustainability responsibilities;
  • Quantifying economic and social development options;
  • Emergence of social procurement strategies;
  • Stakeholder mapping;
  • Working with social enterprises;
  • The importance of the circular economy shift;
  • Designing the organization’s CSR strategy (introduction).

Certificate program participants can expect to:

  • Learn about the precise meaning of CSR as well as the series of actions that need to be implemented in order to design a concise CSR strategy.
  • Gain insights on the current CSR trends and practices applied by leading companies through the analysis of case studies.

The sessions led by Dr. Lyons will be interactive to allow participants to discuss ideas with the instructor and with each other, and to clarify unclear points through in-depth discussions.

To learn more about the CSR Certificate program, call 973-353-1134, email leadership@business.rutgers.edu, or visit http://www.business.rutgers.edu/iel/csr.

ABOUT GOVERNANCE & ACCOUNTABILITY INSTITUTE
Governance & Accountability Institute is a sustainability consulting firm headquartered in New York City, assisting corporations in executing winning strategies that maximize return on investment at every step of their sustainability journey. The G&A team helps corporate and investment community clients recognize, understand and address sustainability issues to address stakeholder and shareholder concerns. G&A Institute is the exclusive Data Partner for the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) in the USA, UK and Ireland. A G&A team of six or more perform this pro bono work on behalf of GRI. In 2015, they analyzed more than 1,200 sustainability reports in this role and databased more than 100 important data points related to each report.

G&A’s sustainability-focused services and resources include: counseling & strategies for the corporate sustainability journey; sustainability reporting assistance; thorough materiality assessments; stakeholder engagement; benchmarking; enhancing investor relations; sustainability communications; manager coaching, team building and training; issues monitoring & customized research; advice on third party awards and recognitions. Visit G&A at www.ga-institute.com

ABOUT THE INSTITUTE FOR ETHICAL LEADERSHIP
The Institute for Ethical Leadership at Rutgers Business School works with business and government, nonprofit and philanthropic organizations, and within Rutgers University to provide leaders and future leaders with the education, training and critical-thinking tools needed to become more effective leaders and managers and make ethical decisions for real-world challenges. For more information, visit www.business.rutgers.edu/iel.